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RHI Magnesita: former CEO passed away after long severe illness
2019-01-31
Jan. 30, 2019 - It is with great sadness that RHI Magnesita announces the passing of former CEO Franz Struzl. Struzl, who passed away on January 28 at the age of 76, led the company from September 2011 to June 2016.

 

“It was an honor for me to work with Franz. He will always be remembered for his strategic views and his modern approaches. He was driving RHI AG forward and participated as a key stakeholder in the merger of RHI and Magnesita that laid the foundation of our sustainable growth,” said Herbert Cordt, Chairman of the Board of Directors of RHI Magnesita.

 

Struzl completed his studies at the Vienna University of Economics and Business in 1965. After more than 40 years at Alpine Steel Group (later voestalpine AG), he became Chairman of voestalpine AG in 2001. He held this position until 2004 and soon afterwards became CEO of voestalpine, Brazil (Villares Metals), remaining there until 2010. In 2011, he joined RHI AG as CEO and was responsible for the increase in profitability. Struzl also participated in the first negotiations regarding the merger of RHI and Magnesita. A severe illness led to his retirement in 2016.

 

Struzl leaves behind his wife Doris and four children. “Our deepest sympathies go out to his family, friends and former colleagues,” Cordt said.
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